Gaming and the University of Denver

Displaying 20160426_162030.jpg

20160426_162030.jpg

Photo by Philip Ryan Wilkinson

 

 

By Philip Ryan Wilkinson

In recent years the influence of video gaming in popular culture has reached an all-time high and it seems to only be increasing with each new generation.  Because of this, people who are against the rise of video gaming believe that it can cause anything between social anxiety and violent behavior.  In order to get to the bottom of this issue I decided to interview a group of three video game playing male roommates from the University of Denver.  The first interviewee Brendan Bagg, 23 is a recently graduated DU Medical student who plays occasionally.  The second is David Dredge, 23 a current mechanical engineering student at DU and the most active gamer of this group.  My final interviewee is Brent Lockhart, 23 is a first year international security graduate student who thinks that his video gaming habits should have caused him more trouble with school in the past.  To the students that I interviewed gaming is more of a controllable hobby rather than an uncontrollable addiction.

Bagg is a busy individual who currently works in the medical field and as such recently he often does not have the time to indulge in hobbies such as video gaming.  However, that does not mean that he won’t go on the occasional bender when the opportunity arises.  On the other hand, in the past before graduation Bagg played a lot more video games.  At times he was concerned that video gaming should have affected his performance as a student.  When asked “has gaming ever effected your courses?” Bagg responded that

“it should have, it didn’t…it was more luck than anything”. (Brendan Bagg, 2016)

From his experience Bagg believes that gaming can be a negative influence on a student’s life if gaming dominates your life but there is nothing wrong with it so long as it does not impede one’s ability to perform as a student.

Dredge, unlike Bagg, is a consistent gamer with a self-proclaimed average of 10 hours a week spent in virtual environments.  While this may seem like a lot of time Dredge insists that gaming has never effected his performance as a student.  Instead, he believes that

“at the very least when managed properly it [gaming] gives you the break that you need.” (David Dredge, 2016)

Immediately after this proclamation however, Dredge added that if overused excessively gaming could have a negative impact on student performance.

My final interviewee Lockhart is an inconsistent gamer who had just gamed for the first time in four mouths on the day of our interview.  He, like Bagg, use to game more but he noticed that video gaming was effecting his performance in school.  Lockhart noticed that,

“Yes, they had a small impact on my student performance because I was playing video games instead of doing homework, but never a serious impact.” (Brent Lockhart, 2016)

From his experience Lockhart believes that gaming cannot have a negative influence on student lives because it is just a hobby.

The students at the University of Denver that I interviewed all had direct experience with gaming in college and they all defended the hobby, to differing extents.  From what I could find video games do not effect a student’s performance when, like many activities, it is taken in moderation.

 

20160424_201507.jpg

Photo by Philip Ryan Wilkinson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Question: Has gaming ever effected your courses?

“Yes, they had a small impact on my student performance because I was playing video games instead of doing homework, but never a serious impact.” (Brent Lockhart, 2016)

Location: Nelson Cafeteria, University of Denver. Sunday, April, 24, 2016.

 

20160424_185543.jpg

Photo by Philip Ryan Wilkinson

Question: Has gaming ever effected your courses?

“It should have, it didn’t…it was more luck than anything”. (Brendan Bagg, 2016)

Location: Nelson Cafeteria, University of Denver. Sunday, April, 24, 2016.

 

recrop.jpg

Photo by Philip Ryan Wilkinson

Question: Do you think that gaming is a negative influence on student’s lives?

“at the very least when managed properly it [gaming] gives you the break that you need.” (David Dredge, 2016)

Location: Nelson Cafeteria, University of Denver. Sunday, April, 24, 2016.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s