Donald Trump: making America great again, or dividing a nation?

 

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Three flag poles in front of the University of Denver – United States, Canada, and Colorado; with a storm glooming in the distance. April, 2016. (Photo: Matt Holden)

In January, CNN Politics ran an article where they talked to over 150 Trump supporters in 31 cities to find out their reasons for voting Trump.  Young and old voters alike boasted their love for Trump, many of them referring to themselves as “the silent majority” in the upcoming election. The majority of this “silent majority” seemed to support Trump for all the same reasons; they agree with his policies on immigration, foreign affairs, and his distrust of Barack Obama.  They see his success in business as a sign that he will successfully bring our country out of a recession, and make America great again.

Another large turn-on, or turn-off (depending on who you are) is Trump’s disregard for a filter.  The guy says what he wants, and often what he says is not politically correct.  The American population seems to either love him for his bluntness, or absolutely despise him for it.  Trump’s Twitter account is a great place to view his nontraditional rhetoric; where he calls his opponents names like “Lyin’ Ted”, “Crooked Hilary”, and even “1 for 38 Kasich” (referring to his 1 win and 38 losses). Continue reading

The University of Denver after Title IX

 

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The stairwell of the University of Denver’s Nagel Hall. [Photo by: Cooper Dahlen-Pagano]

Campus sexual assault, nonconsensual sexual conduct of a student within the boundaries of an institution of higher education, has been a controversial issue nationwide.

According to the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC), one in five women and one in 16 men are victims of campus sexual assault. Additionally, more than 90 percent of the victims don’t report the crimes. Organizations such as NSVRC and universities across the country are taking steps to raise awareness with sexual assault recognition and prevention programs.

In 2014, 55 collegiate institutions were subject to investigation for Title IX violations by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, including the University of Denver. Since then, DU’s Center for Advocacy, Prevention and Empowerment (CAPE) has increased their presence on campus.

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Beyoncé as the newest political icon

 

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Two University of Denver students view Lemonade. [Photo by Shea Geary]

If you left your house this past weekend its likely you heard someone talking about Lemonade, and no I’m not talking about what you drank on the sizzling Friday afternoon. On Saturday, Apr. 23 Beyoncé released her most recent album, a video album titled Lemonade. The visual album took fans by storm with its intense lyrics and meaningful sound as well as mesmerizing film styles.

With the 2016 election coming up in November, political opinions are at a high and with the release of Lemonade Beyoncé has put herself on the forefront of multiple political issues, specifically the black lives matter movement and women’s rights. During Beyoncé’s last tour she took to empowering women through her song Girls Run the World and having only two men working on her tour. The newest video album covered topics ranging from infidelity to police brutality, bringing more of her views into the spotlight.

With all of these issues brought up by such a prominent pop culture icon it is important to ask how Beyoncé’s statements will affects smaller communities like that of University of Denver. Continue reading

Fake ID’s responsible for binge drinking

 

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A popular campus bar [Courtesy of Merchant’s Mile High Saloon]

DENVER- False identification (fake IDs) are nothing new on college campuses. They allow underage teenagers to purchase alcohol, and in certain states, marijuana, and attend bars. Students say if you know where to go, you won’t get caught.

Certain events such as spring break and music festivals lead to mass arrests of students when police forces crack down. At Coachella music festival in California this past weekend, more than a hundred underage festival-goers were arrested, including high profile actors and actresses. Police forces at popular spring break destinations seize thousands of fake IDs during spring break.

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AMC rules against texting in its theaters

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Implementations Specialist Nick Allgeier checks his phone in an Aurora, Colo. movie theater, Monday, April 25, 2016. [Photo by Hayley Knoph]

With modern society’s obsession with new technology, the illumination of the smartphone screen is seemingly inescapable. The sacred untouched darkness of the movie theater was even at risk of being disturbed by the glow—that is until AMC chief executive Adam Aron backed down from his idea of allowing cell phone usage in the theater chain.

“When you tell a 22-year-old to turn off the phone, don’t ruin the movie, they hear please cut off your left arm above the elbow” Aron said in an interview with Variety on April 13. Continue reading

Controversy mounts over transgender bathroom policies

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A University of Denver wall that allows students to express themselves sports the phrase, “Protect Trans Lives.”  Sunday, April 24, 2016,  Driscoll Green, University of Denver, Denver, CO [photo by Jessica Johnson]

After juggling the benefits and challenges of allowing transgender individuals to use public bathrooms that correspond to their gender identity, companies such as Target, and state legislators in states like North Carolina have incited controversy through the release of transgender policies that dictate which restrooms should be used by whom.

Target released a statement on April 19, 2016, that they were officially instating a policy allowing transgender individuals to utilize restroom and changing facilities corresponding to their gender identity, regardless of biological sex.   Continue reading

Gaming and the University of Denver

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Photo by Philip Ryan Wilkinson

 

 

By Philip Ryan Wilkinson

In recent years the influence of video gaming in popular culture has reached an all-time high and it seems to only be increasing with each new generation.  Because of this, people who are against the rise of video gaming believe that it can cause anything between social anxiety and violent behavior.  In order to get to the bottom of this issue I decided to interview a group of three video game playing male roommates from the University of Denver.  The first interviewee Brendan Bagg, 23 is a recently graduated DU Medical student who plays occasionally.  The second is David Dredge, 23 a current mechanical engineering student at DU and the most active gamer of this group.  My final interviewee is Brent Lockhart, 23 is a first year international security graduate student who thinks that his video gaming habits should have caused him more trouble with school in the past.  To the students that I interviewed gaming is more of a controllable hobby rather than an uncontrollable addiction.

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